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Looking Back, January 1959

Briefings

21.11.Hiller 12E          Meeting the requirements of the newer Civil Air Regulations which were stiffened in 1956 with regard to flight safety and structural integrity, the Hiller H-12E was awarded official Type Certification by the FAA.  The Hiller H-12E is the only commercial helicopter in the three-place category certified under the new CAR.  In addition . . .
          . . . Fairey Aviation’s Rotordyne has established a world’s speed record in the new convertiplane category in flying a 100 kilometer course at an average 190.9 miles per hour.

Source:  See page 4, “Briefings,” Army Aviation, Vol. 7, No. 1, Army Aviation Publications, Westport, Ct., January 24, 1959.

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Milestone

21.11.Milestone XV 3          Another milestone in aviation history was reached when Bell Helicopter Corporation’s XV-3 Convertiplane achieved 100% in-flight conversion of its tilting rotors in mid-December.
          The full conversion was the world’s first by a titling rotor, fixed wing aircraft, Bell claimed, and was achieved at an altitude of 4,000 feet and at an airspeed of 115 knots.
          The speed is in the normal range for conversion from helicopter to the airplane configuration.  Maximum airplane speed of the XV-3, utilizing its present piston engine, is estimated to be 150 knots.
          The convertiplane, developed for the U.S. Army, would more than double this speed capability in larger versions.
          “The conversion climaxed a long-range development program by Bell, aimed at producing a propulsion system having high efficiency both for helicopter vertical lift and airplane high-speed flight,” said Bertram Kelley, Bell’s vice president for engineering.  “The rotor-propellers are of a radical new design which open up vast possibilities,” he added.

Source:   See page 14, “Milestone,” Army Aviation, Vol. 7, No. 1, Army Aviation Publications, Westport, Ct., January 24, 1959.


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Snooper

21.11.Snooper SD 4          A small turbojet and pilotless aircraft that can swoop over the battlefield to gather military information is one of the newest surveillance drones under Army development.
          The drone, known as the SWALLOW and designated SD-4 by the Army, will use a variety of advanced techniques for military surveillance purposes, including radar, infra-red and photography.
          The SWALLOW is being developed and produced by Republic Aviation Corporation’s Guided Missiles Division for the Army Signal Corps under a $25,000,000 contract.  The contract calls for detail design and production of both the new drone and ground control units.

Source:  See page 14, Army Aviation, Vol. 7, No. 1, Army Aviation Publications, Westport, Ct., January 24, 1959.

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The Christmas Spirit

21.11.ChristmasSpirit          A combination of a training exercise and the Christmas spirit sees an Army H-34 Choctaw, from the 82nd Aviation Company, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, transporting a 40-foot spruce four miles, from the Reservation to Division Headquarters.  Attached to the helicopter, by use of 75 feet of manila hemp, the tree was pinpointed into a six-foot hole on the headquarters lawn.  The Santa’s helpers piloting the H-34 were CWOs Teller Diggers and Andre Carson.
          After the tree was made secure, the engineers moved to the task of trimming the tree.  In short order, the spruce was quickly adorned with wires, lights and decorations.

Source:  See page 26, Army Aviation, Vol. 7, No. 1, Army Aviation Publications, Westport, Ct., January 24, 1959.

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Fly Beta Kappa

21.11.FlyBetaKappa          Jack Smith, Master of Ceremonies for the nationally televised show, YOU ASKED FOR IT, is presented with a congratulations by Charles Kirchner, Vice President of Public and Industrial Relations, Kaman Aircraft Corporation.  Jack Smith learned to fly the Kaman HTK remote control helicopter.  This two-day training was filmed for the TV show.  
          With the conclusion of filming, Smith was presented the insignia of the “Kaman Armchair Pilots Association,” an organization of people who though they knoweth not that they can flyeth doeth. . .

Source:  See page 26, Army Aviation, Vol. 7, No. 1, Army Aviation Publications, Westport, Ct., January 24, 1959.